sex dating in jamesburg new jersey - Consolidating school districts within a state

Many districts retain at least one assistant superintendent as well.

More than three-quarters of Illinois’ superintendents have six-figure salaries, and many also get additional benefits in car and housing allowances, as well as bonuses.

In addition, their high salaries lead to pension benefits of $2 million to $6 million each over the course of their retirements.

That partnership should come in the form of a district consolidation commission, which would work with local governments to create consolidation and reorganization guidelines, select candidate districts, and establish a process for implementation.

The commission would also support the creation of legislation that would mandate its proposed recommendations through an up or down vote, meaning no amendments would be permitted, in the General Assembly.

By 1955, the state had cut the number of districts to 2,242, and by the year 2000, the district count had fallen to 894. Nearly 45 percent are elementary, 12 percent are secondary (high school), and 45 percent are unit districts, meaning they serve both elementary and secondary students.

Despite the massive reduction in Illinois school districts, the state is still not efficient when compared with its 14 peer states that also serve 1 million or more students.

These local units of government are also responsible for Illinois’ growing property taxes, which already rank as the third-highest in the country.

Many of the state’s local governments could be consolidated – which would help to reduce their negative effects.

For an example of districts where consolidation makes sense, consider New Trier Township High School District 203 and its six elementary feeder districts.

Combining these seven districts into one would eliminate many of the 136 administrators directly employed at the seven district offices, saving local taxpayers over million a year in salaries alone, or over

Despite the massive reduction in Illinois school districts, the state is still not efficient when compared with its 14 peer states that also serve 1 million or more students.These local units of government are also responsible for Illinois’ growing property taxes, which already rank as the third-highest in the country.Many of the state’s local governments could be consolidated – which would help to reduce their negative effects.For an example of districts where consolidation makes sense, consider New Trier Township High School District 203 and its six elementary feeder districts.Combining these seven districts into one would eliminate many of the 136 administrators directly employed at the seven district offices, saving local taxpayers over $12 million a year in salaries alone, or over $1,000 per student.If considered carefully and implemented properly, school district consolidation could provide serious financial benefits to both local taxpayers and the state, have a positive effect on student outcomes, and increase government transparency at the local level. fell dramatically, to fewer than 20,000 from over 120,000. In 1942, Illinois had more than 12,000 districts – the most of any state in the nation.

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Despite the massive reduction in Illinois school districts, the state is still not efficient when compared with its 14 peer states that also serve 1 million or more students.

These local units of government are also responsible for Illinois’ growing property taxes, which already rank as the third-highest in the country.

Many of the state’s local governments could be consolidated – which would help to reduce their negative effects.

For an example of districts where consolidation makes sense, consider New Trier Township High School District 203 and its six elementary feeder districts.

Combining these seven districts into one would eliminate many of the 136 administrators directly employed at the seven district offices, saving local taxpayers over $12 million a year in salaries alone, or over $1,000 per student.

If considered carefully and implemented properly, school district consolidation could provide serious financial benefits to both local taxpayers and the state, have a positive effect on student outcomes, and increase government transparency at the local level. fell dramatically, to fewer than 20,000 from over 120,000. In 1942, Illinois had more than 12,000 districts – the most of any state in the nation.

||

Despite the massive reduction in Illinois school districts, the state is still not efficient when compared with its 14 peer states that also serve 1 million or more students.

These local units of government are also responsible for Illinois’ growing property taxes, which already rank as the third-highest in the country.

Many of the state’s local governments could be consolidated – which would help to reduce their negative effects.

For an example of districts where consolidation makes sense, consider New Trier Township High School District 203 and its six elementary feeder districts.

,000 per student.

If considered carefully and implemented properly, school district consolidation could provide serious financial benefits to both local taxpayers and the state, have a positive effect on student outcomes, and increase government transparency at the local level. fell dramatically, to fewer than 20,000 from over 120,000. In 1942, Illinois had more than 12,000 districts – the most of any state in the nation.

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